Mediterranean Cities, mapping & urban analysis project (2016)

Analysis of Portofino, Zadar and Piraeus allow us to notice unique image and different major elements in each three of them., yet aspect that connects all three cities is port, being the most important part of their lives as well as reason of their start and growth. Moreover, port as visual element and provider of convenient movement creates touristic appeal. Outcomes it brings for the city may vary in details.

 

portofino urban analysis

PORTOFINO

Italy
Founded by the Romans and named Portus Delphini, is a small town located southeast of Genova. Nowadays very famous for its picturesque harbour surrounding green hills, a variety of hotels and restaurants, and historical monuments.
zadar  urban analysis

ZADAR

Croatia
Port played the main role in the life of Mediterranean Croatian city of Zadar. 
The evidence of the settlements goes back to the 9th century BC. Although it developed under Roman control from the 2nd century BC. The typical Roman layout of the town, its city walls and gates as well as other important buildings were all constructed during this period, and are seen till nowadays.
piraeus  urban analysis

PIRAEUS

Greece
‘The place over the passage‘ has been inhabited since the 26th century BC. Piraeus was a rocky island with a steep hill of Munichia (modern-day Kastella) (4800 – 3400 B.C.). Slowly merging with the land and acquiring present day look.

Portofino

 
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Portofino, as mentioned before, unlike other Mediterranean cities and towns has a low level of urban development due to different factors. In two centuries time population decreased and in the modern day time, starting from the 19th century, main points of interest was not fishing or port-trade culture anymore, but tourism. Today the tourists’ density exceeds local density in summer and even in winterlow season.Another factor of urban development stagnation is pointing to the structure of this region.  Portofino is a part of the natural reserve - Park of Portofino. The only part allowed having building like urban development is less than 1 km2 coastal “sector of villas and gardens”, which includes some small parts of “historical centre” – Punta Cervera and Portofino’s northern hill.

 

Bibliography & References
• Pace G. (2002) Ways of Thinking and Looking at the Mediterranean City - Istituto diStudisulle
Societ`a del Mediterraneo. MPRA Paper No. 10511 (http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/10511/)

• Fortuna R., Maria P. (2013) Historic Urban Landscape Approach and Port Cities Regeneration: Naples between Identity and Outlook. MDPI Journal. 5, 4268-4287; doi:10.3390/su5104268 (www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability)

• Hohlfelder R. L., Malkin I. (1988) Mediterranean Cities: Historical Perspectives. Frank Cass Publishers, London

• Merk O. (2014) The Mediterranean port-city economy: the cases of Marseille and Mersin. 1: OECD, France

 

Zadar

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Port played the main role in life of the city of Zadar. Trade accomplished by the port and a very good geographical position made an urban city develop fast. The evidence of the settlements goes back to the 9th century BC. Although it developed under Roman control from the 2nd century BC. The typical Roman layout of town, its city walls and gates as well as other important buildings were all constructed during this period, and are seen till nowadays

 

After the 9th century AC Zadar became a part of Croatian state and experienced the development of the culture and the port which increased an interest towards it for strong and big empires, like Venetian and Ottoman ones. During World War II, the town was heavily bombed – the half of the town’s buildings was destroyed, bringing a huge life loss. Despite this devastation and the following Croatian war, Zadar has been speedily developing till nowadays.
How the official site of Zadar states, it is the urban center of northern Dalmatia where the administrative, economic, cultural and political center of the region with 92,000 inhabitants is situated. It is a city monument, surrounded by historical ramparts, archaeological and monumental treasury of ancient and medieval times, Renaissance and many contemporary architectural achievements.

 

Zadar can be characterized as a port-city; its urban evolution’s foundation was laid by the trade between different countries, valuable connection between the sea and the land. In some issues we can state that it is dependent on it, although at the same time it is growing in other spheres. Due to its uninterrupting development and void space perspective it started enlarging itself further, organically going out of the old city limits.


The urban part of the city is organized by legible blogs - historical, residential and industrial. There are various ports, marinas and a big industrial district’s state-controlled port which is a closed zone, located on the side from the historical area. By the virtue of tourists' growing number and governmental interest towards this factor of city and region development Zadar becomes more urbanely and infrastructurally advanced.

 

 

Bibliography & References

• Magaš D., Mirošević L., Faričić J. (2010) Cartographic heritage in the Zadar (Croatia) scientific and cultural institutions. e-Perimetron, Vol. 5, No. 4

• Merk O. (2014) The Mediterranean port-city economy: the cases of Marseille and Mersin. 1: OECD, France

• Hohlfelder R. L., Malkin I. (1988) Mediterranean Cities: Historical Perspectives. Frank Cass Publishers, London

• Jurlina T. (2013) Tourism in figures. Ministry of Tourism Prisavlje, Zagreb

• Ermal Shpuza (2009) Evolution of Street Networks  in Adriatic and Ionian Coastal Cities  1769-2007. KTH, Stockholm

• Georgopoulou M. (2001) Venice’s Mediterranean Colonies: Architecture and Urbanism. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge

Piraeus

 
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Proximity to water has been the key factor for area development. Therefore Piraeus was the port of Athens throughout the Archaic, Classical  and Hellenistic periods. Athens were wholly dependent and still are in terms of connection with the entire world by the sea and maintenance of the inner life of the city. Piraeus had become the leading port and the second city in Greece, important center of trade, having the strong economical, industrial, infrastructural status, being the gate of the center of Greek civilization for  4,000 years.  Its rise turned it into the metropolis, and now as well as in the past the city is lead and influenced by the port, which also brought the flow of urban and population growth. These two cities are an example of inter-development and interference. They are merged to one agglomeration and we can easily state that  Piraeus is as inconceivable without Athens, as Athens without their Port-City.

 

Bibliography & References

• Piraeus, the ancient island of Athens: Evidence from Holocene sediments and historical archives. Kosmas J.-P. G., Pavlopoulos P., Triantaphyllou E. F. M., Etienne R.. Geology, 2011

 

• Soltaniehha M., Peric A., Scholl B.. The Port of Piraeus: Industrial Zone or Urban Continuity. Institute for Spatial and Landscape Development (IRL). 50th ISOCARP Congress ETH. Zurich, Switzerland 2014
 

• Y. E.Hadjimanolakis. The Port of Piraeus Through The Ages. greece.org. Retrieved 2009

 

Encyclopædia Britannica, Athens, The Acropolis, p.6/20, 2008, O.Ed.

 

• G. Apostolopoulos, K. Pavlopoulos, J.-P. Goiran, E. Fouache. Was the Piraeus peninsula (Greece) a rocky island? Detection of pre Holocene rocky relief with borehole data and resistivity tomography analysis. Journal of Archaeological Science 42. 2014

 

• Leontidou L.. The Mediterranean city in transition; Social Change and Urban Development. Cambridge University Press. 1. 1990 77

 

• Morelli V. G., Salvati  L.. Ad Hoc Urban Sprawl in the Mediterranean City: Dispersing a Compact Tradition?. Edizioni Nuova Cultura, 2010 

 

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